Tag: politics

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Just What Are Men and Women, Anyway?

John William Godward, The Old, Old Story (1903)
Sometimes, the most important questions are the basic ones. Back in 2011, I argued that the most important question in the gay-marriage debate was "What is marriage?" The next year, Robert George, Ryan Anderson, and Sherif Girgis published a book exploring just that question: What Is Marriage?: Man and Woman: A Defense. But in the face of contemporary questions of transgenderism and gender identity, it turns out that we need to ask a yet more-basic question: what are men and women, and what makes them different?

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Can We Be Americans AND Christians?

A recent Facebook commenter claimed that "To be a Christian American, you must believe in the separation of Church and State. The Will of God has no place in superseding a rule of law. By living a Christian Life and not judging others, we show our ability to follow in the footsteps of Christ." Here are five reasons that's a dangerous position to hold as either a Christian or an American.

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Seven Answers to the “Pro-Lifers are just Pro-Birth” Argument

One of the most common ad hominem arguments against the pro-life movement is that pro-life people only really care about the unborn, and don’t care what happens after birth (or about the conditions into which the child will be born). Often, this argument goes hand-in-glove with the argument that is pro-lifers really want to be pro-life, they have to support giving more money to such-and-such a social program, or hand out free condoms, or endorse some other politically-liberal policy. Other times, the argument is that pro-lifers need to personally adopt kids, or else be content to let them get aborted. Here are seven answers to that argument.

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Suffering and the Sanctity of Life: Why We Don’t See Eye-to-Eye on Abortion and Euthanasia

Jack Kevorkian, Very Still Life (2000)
Is it wrong to take an innocent human life if you can do it without inflicting pain? What about if killing the person reduces the amount of pain that they're in? In the debates about both assisted suicide and abortion, it's common to see two incompatible camps emerge. Despite all of the yelling and nastiness between the two sides, there are people in both camps who are trying to do the right thing. Frequently (not always), the problem is that they've simply got two incompatible moral codes. One side looks at the reduction/cessation of suffering, while the other side is rooted in a view of the inherent sanctity of human life. So who's right, and how can we know?

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3 Surprising Lessons from Jesus’ Weirdest Parable

Hieronymus Bosch, Death and the Miser (detail) (1490)
The weirdest and most troubling of Jesus' parables is almost certainly the parable of the dishonest manager in Luke 16, in which Jesus presents a parable of a manager who, upon being fired, exploits his position to cut deals with his master's clients so that he can try to leverage this into a job with them. Rather than being justly furious, the master *praises him* for his ingenuity. What on earth is going on? Three things to keep in mind with this parable.

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Wait for the Lord: Learning from Judith, Anna and Simeon

Giovanni Bellini, The Presentation in the Temple (1499)
In the face of a political and personal future that often seems uncertain or unpleasant, it's easy to lose heart and to despair of God's presence in our lives. Fortunately, Scripture presents a radically different message. Here's what Judith, Simeon and Anna have to show us about aligning our lives to God's timetable, instead of trusting in secular salvation.

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