Tag: Eucharist

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The Dog That Didn’t Bark: Eucharistic Theology in the Early Church

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In the Sherlock Holmes story “Silver Blaze,” involving the disappearance of a thoroughbred racehorse, Holmes points out a major clue: Gregory (Scotland Yard detective): “Is there any other point to which you would wish to draw my attention?” Holmes: “To the curious incident of the dog in the night-time.” Gregory: “The dog did nothing in […]

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The Case Against Protestant Special Pleading

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If you’re not familiar, “special pleading” is a type of logical fallacy; Wikipedia explains that it “involves someone attempting to cite something as an exemption to a generally accepted rule, principle, etc. without justifying the exemption.” So for example, you might argue for the general rule that “thieves should be punished, because stealing is wrong,” but then […]

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Come and Stay with Christ: Abp. Dolan’s Call for Eucharistic Adoration

Archbishop Dolan really seems to “get” it.  It’s so refreshing to hear the Gospel laid out in such bar and beautiful terms, particularly by the Archbishop of New York City. In a beautiful blog post about Eucharistic Adoration (with a nod towards Kansas City’s International House of Prayer, a non-denominational church which does 24/7 prayer), + […]

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The Charismatic Movement and the Catholic Church

One of the points of disagreement within Christianity is between “Cessationists” (who believe that some of the extraordinary gifts of the Holy Spirit, like tongues and prophesy, died out with the Apostles) and the “Continuationists” (who say that those gifts never died out). I’m not looking to settle that dispute today.  Rather, I wanted to point out something […]

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