Month: May 2012

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Was the Immaculate Conception Imposed on Catholics in 1854?

Earlier this month, I responded to a number of objections about Mary’s sinlessness raised by a non-denominational reader. That same reader responded, via e-mail. One of his arguments against the Immaculate Conception goes like this: Francisco de Zurbarán,Immaculate Conception (1635) Does it concern you that your statement was based on a dogma, the Immaculate Conception, […]

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Are All Sins Equally Bad? Are All Saints Equally Good?

Colijn de Coter, Saint Michael Weighing Souls (detail)(16th c.). Protestants typically believe that all sins are equally bad, and all Saints are equally good.  For example, a Kansas middle school teacher is in hot water for writing, according to the Huffington Post, that “Being Gay Is ‘The Same As Murder’.” Despite the quotation marks, the teacher didn’t […]

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Saint Thérèse of Lisieux’s Parents and Vocational Discernment

Louis Martin, Thérèse’s father I’ve finally gotten around to reading St. Thérèse of Lisieux’s autobiography, The Story of a Soul. It’s a great read, but one of the things that fascinated me was actually from the introduction, which gave some background on Thérèse’s family. Thérèse’s parents were holy, and wanted to give their entire lives to […]

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Thomas Jefferson, Martin Luther King, and the Religion in the Public Square

Carl A. Anderson gave the Address at the National Catholic Prayer Breakfast last month, and spoke eloquently on the place of religion in the public square. He cited to President Kennedy’s 1961 Inaugural Address, in which the president spoke of the rights for which “our forebears fought,” namely “the belief that the rights of man […]

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