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Dietrich von Hildebrand and the Incoherent Paradox of Modernity

Dietrich von Hildebrand
More than 60 years ago, Dietrich von Hildebrand recognized that contemporary society was in the grip of a peculiar paradox between widespread disbelief in objective truth and fawning credulity in regards to all things scientific. At the heart of this paradox is modern man's refusal to accept that he is a creature and not God. This prognosis of society is all the more true in 2016 than it was in 1953. So what's a Christian to do in the face of modernity's incoherence and its attempt to dethrone God?

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Jewish Purgatory

Ludovico Carracci, An Angel Frees the Souls of Purgatory (1610)
Are Catholics right to pray for the dead, and to believe that such prayers can help to release souls from Purgatory? Many Christians are unaware that these doctrines are Jewish in origin, and that the Jewish practice of praying for the dead continues on to this day. Even fewer are aware that this practice of prayer is tied to a tradition of temporary purgatorial fires after death.

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Six Biblical Passages to Revolutionize Your View of Prayer and Heaven

Matthias Gerung, The Triumph of the Lamb / The Fall of Babylon (1532)
Protestants tend to be opposed to praying to the Saints and Angels for two reasons: (1) it's offensive to the dignity of God, since we're going to someone besides Him; or (2) it's a waste of time, since we can go directly to God. This hints at the underlying issue - that Catholics and Protestants tend to think of prayer and Heaven very differently. So the core question ought to be: is the Catholic vision of prayer and Heaven true?

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Answering 6 Arguments Against the “Apocrypha”

Zacharias, woodcut from the Nuremberg Chronicles (1493)
Protestant Bibles have seven fewer books than Catholic Bibles. These seven books are called "the Deuterocanon" by Catholics, and "the Apocrypha" by Protestants (although, confusingly, they also use "the Apocrypha" to refer to several other books, ones that are rejected by Catholics and Protestants alike). So what's the basis for the Protestant rejection of these books? Matt Slick, at the popular Protestant website CARM (Christian Apologetics & Research Ministry), offers six reasons, each of which turns out to rely upon lies, deceptions, or double standards.

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Suffering and the Sanctity of Life: Why We Don’t See Eye-to-Eye on Abortion and Euthanasia

Jack Kevorkian, Very Still Life (2000)
Is it wrong to take an innocent human life if you can do it without inflicting pain? What about if killing the person reduces the amount of pain that they're in? In the debates about both assisted suicide and abortion, it's common to see two incompatible camps emerge. Despite all of the yelling and nastiness between the two sides, there are people in both camps who are trying to do the right thing. Frequently (not always), the problem is that they've simply got two incompatible moral codes. One side looks at the reduction/cessation of suffering, while the other side is rooted in a view of the inherent sanctity of human life. So who's right, and how can we know?

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